Report on the conclusions of the Task Force on Barnard and the Educated Woman, with edits, 1971, page 4

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          the subject is one of vital concern to a wide cross section of our
graduates.
Major presentations included: author-alumna Elizabeth Janeway

discussing her new boolg" Man's World, Woman's Place"; Educ-a-t—ioxr

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 (A-or

ProfessornPatricia Graham on Women in Academe; a report on the

vocational achievements and problems of the Class of 1965;

Congressman Jonathan Bingham on Legislative Changes of Concern
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to Women; a panel discussion of the psychological stresses of

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concern to women; and career workshops in the arts, business and
.

science. Although presented in depth and expanded to two full

days, the program maintained its momentum to the last workshop

session, and the audience clearly sustained its interest in the

problems and possibilities being explored.

 

‘/‘l::.»; fjezt. he  V’ ,,d¢,_1,‘, Vat/3,1/);,¢K7 LL-

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v'1=hese~expl1>re-Eions—and—t/he resu—1tin' cbnclaeéofi pointed the‘

way-rt}; an in-depth study of how Barnard could best respond to the
challenges of the new feminism.  Task Force on
Barnard and the Educated Woman, composed of trustees, faculty,

alumnae, students and administrators has been exploring three basic

questions:

1) Does Barnard College, an undergraduate institution, have