Conference report for The Scholar and The Feminist III, 1976, page 5

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          Most comments indicated that, despite the proliferation of confer-
ences on issues in Women's Studies, women in the professions, and related
themes, the Barnard conference continues to be a unique and important
event. In particular, people who had attended all three conferences re-
marked on the feeling of continuity and of development that linked them as
a series, with each conference building, conceptually, on the one before.
They expressed the sense of being part of an on—going institution or forum
that responded, at each point, to their most current concerns. And indeed,
if we look at the series as a whole, we can see a progression from the
general issue of the relation of feminism and scholarship to the specific
problem, or research focus, the search for origins, that is central to the
work feminist scholars are now carrying on. The Scholar and The Feminist
has thus evolved in direct relation to the growth and the increasing
maturity of feminist scholarship itself, from its thoughtful and provoca-
tive beginnings to its present status as a major trend in the academic

world.

Hester Eisenstein
April 19, 1976