"Columbia Women's Liberation, Report from the Committee on Discrimination Against Women Faculty" Barnard Alumnae Magazine, Spring 1970, page 2

Download: Transcript

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 View All

Show transcript

          report would have to consider such factors.

Since a woman does not invest time, energy and money in obtaining a
doctorate in order to be a better wife and mother or more entertaining companion
for her husband, women should be represented in a proportion that reflects
the numbers of doctorates going to women. Those who argue that a woman’s »
commitment to her profession differs from that of a man must be able to cite
detailed studies of the career patterns of highly trained women.°

Women earned an average of 15 per cent of all doctorates awarded during
the 1940s; an average of 10 per cent of all doctorates awarded during the
19505; and an average of 11 per cent during the 19605. Given the normal
timetable of the academic career, we would expect to find the women who
earned their degrees in the 19405 represented now in the higher ranks of the
faculty of Columbia and comparable institutions in a proportion of 15
per cent, and in the lower ranks in a proportion of 10 per cent. The following
table, drawn from Columbia’s catalogues for the academic year 1968-69
tells another story.‘

How Should W/omen
Be Represented?

Associates
Associate Assistant Preccptors

Scrroor. Professor Professor Professor Instructor Lecturer Assistants
Columbia 1/133 0/68 7/101 8/76 -—— 20/50
College (0.7%) (0%) (6.5%) (9.5%) (29%)
Law 0/34 0/2 0/4 — —- ——
School (0%) (0%) (0%)

School of 1

Dental & 0/78 1/70 1/102 0/54 —~ ' 0/31
Oral Surgery (0%) (1%) (1%) (0%) (0%)
School of 3/87 0/23 1/17 0/1 —— --
Int’l. Affairs v (3%) (0%) (6%) V (0%)

School of 2/37 0/23 0/13 ——- —- -—
Business (5%) (0%) (0%)

General 5/49 8/28 8/48 17/42 -—- 1 24/43
Studies (9%) (22%) (14%) (29%) (36%)
Graduate 8/367 10/74 "7/52 — I --
Faculties (2.1%) (12%) (12%)

Barnard 11/38 12/12 21/12 15/16 ' —— 23/5
College (22%) (50%) (64%) (48%) (82%)
American 0/3 129/16
Language — -— - ~— —- (0% ) (64%)
Program .

EXPLANATION: The figures given above are the ratio of women to men in that category.
The figures in parentheses below this ratio are the percentages of
the total number of teachers represented by women.

more likely to earn a Ph.D. in the humanities rather than in science. In 1966, for
example, 17.4% of the doctorates in the humanities and social sciences went to
women although only 11% of all Ph.D.s awarded went to women.

3 A study of 1,979 women who received doctorates in the years 1957-8 showed that
91% were working, 81% of them full-time. (Helen Astin, The Woman Doctorate,
Basic Books, 1970, quoted by Malcolm J. Scully, “Women in Higher Education
Challenging the Status Quo,” The Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 9, 1970,
pp. 2-5, especially p. 4).

4 For professional‘ schools such as Law, Dental and Oral Surgery, International

BARNARD ALUMNAE'/ SPRING 1970 / 13