Conference plan for the 1993 The Scholar and the Feminist conference, 1993

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BARNARD

Barnard College - Columbia University ° 3009 Broadway ° New York, NY 10027 -6598

 

The Barnard Center for Research on Women

(212) 854-2067

The scholar and the Feminist, 1993

Proposed title: Women as Change Makers: Building and Using Political Power.

This conference will focus on how women do and should seek

‘power through movement politics and electoral politics. Conference

organizers pre-suppose that there are many routes to power, and many different kinds of power: in workplaces, in homes, in healthcare, in religious institutions, in the arts, in education, and in bureaucracies, courts, legislatures, and executive offices.

The heart of the conference will lie in analyzing women's relationship to state power, as well as the strategic choice to develop institutions apart from the state that can generate power. We will examine how women gain power locally and nationally, and how they can best gain power in the future. Additionally, we will explore what women do with power once they get it, and ask what they should do with it.

The conference hopes to bring together appointed and elected government officials, and would-be officials; feminist activists and would-be activists; feminist scholars and would-be scholars, for constructive discussion and debate.

Suggested Format:

9:00--9:15 Welcome and Introductions: Ellen Futter and Leslie Calman

I. Morning Plenary 9:15--9:45 two 10-15 minute speeches by prominent, exciting speakers:   i.e. Ann Richards and Johnetta Coles? Anita Hill and Barbara Boxer? Lynn Yeakel and Carol Mosely Braun?

9:45--10:30 Discussion (with a moderator) between the two,  and questions from the floor.

II. Workshops 10:45--12:15 Workshops: 2-3 facilitators, with 25

participants. Plan 20 workshops.

12:30--1:30 Lunch

  BARNARD

Barnard College ° Columbia University ° 3009 Broadway ° New York, NY 10027-6598

 

The Barnard Center for Research on Women

(212) 854-2067

III. Panels

1:45—-3:15 5 big panels: i.e. 2-3 speakers, and a moderator, with 80-100 participants.

IV. 3:30-5:00 Closing speaker(s)? Anna Quindlen? - Susan Faludi?

Marie Wilson? or a panel...? (i.e. see "Whither Feminism" below)

Rationale for the two different types of workshops/panels: The smaller workshops have the virtue of allowing for real exchange and discussion, and a multiplicity of topics and

facilitators/speakers. The larger panels will allow us to attract some additional

"stars," who I presume will only come if they're told they're going to play to a big audience. In addition, if we're planning for 400-500 participants, that requires as many as 20 workshops to accommodate everyone (25x20=500). It would be very cumbersome to try to create gg workshops (20 in the morning, 20 in the afternoon). The panels would have, in addition to the panelists, a

moderator, whose job it would be to field questions and allow for

maximum audience/panelist interaction.

Possible topics and speakers for panels and workshops: (many of which could be further sub-divided!)  

Whither Feminism: How To create a Popular and Powerful Women's Agenda? Eleanor Smeal Patricia Ireland Angela Davis Marie Wilson Pat Schroeder Barbara Boxer   What grass roots movements?

Getting and Using Power for Women in the Cities Ruth Messinger Sharon Pratt Kelly Carrie Saxon Perry Kathy Whitmire

BARNARD

Barnard College ° Columbia University f 3009 Broadway ° New York, NY 10027-6598

The Barnard Center for Research on Women

(212) 854-2067

Carol Bellamy Prof. Ester Fuchs Prof. Joyce Gelb

seeking and Gaining Political Office: How It's Done

Presentations by

National Women's Political Caucus

Women's Campaign Fund

EMILY’S List B

WISH

Reproductive Rights: Where Do We Go From Here?

Kate Michaelman

Faye Wattleton

National Black Women's Health Project

WHAM!

Republicans for Choice

Prof. Rosalind Petchesky

Prof. Suzanne Staggenborg (author of The Pro—Choice

Movement, Oxford, 1991)

Theories of Women and the state Catharine MacKinon

Women as Judges: Do they Make a Difference? Eve Premminger Sandra Day O'Connor Rosalind Richter

Women in congress: Do they Make a Difference? Prof. Ruth Mandel Sen. Barbara Mikulski Rep. Claudine Schneider

Strategies for Lesbian Legal and Political Empowerment Urvashi Vaid, NGLTF y Paula Ettelbrick, Lambda Legal Defense and Education

Fund Rep. Barney Frank

Women, the Arts and the state: Fighting Censorship Prof. Natalie Kampen Catharine Stimpson

Native American Women and Political Power Wilma Mankiller (Cherokee Nation)

 

BARNARD

Barnard College ° Columbia University ° 3009 Broadway ° New York, NY 10027-6598

The Barnard Center for Research on Women .

(212)854L2067

Ada Deer (Menominee Tribe, Wisconsin) Ramona Bennett( Pulollop Tribe, Washington State)

What Do Women Want, Anyway? Pollsters and Pundits

Ethel Klein

Celinda Lake

Linda DiVall

Barbara Farah

Prof. Michael Delli Carpini

The Power of the Media Woman: Women covering Politics Cokie Roberts Katha Pollitt Ellen Goodman Bonnie Angelo Murphy Brown (hey, if Dan Quayle can dream...)

The Power of the Media: How Media Cover Women in Politics

Women and Health: Moving the State

Rep. Pat Schroeder

Rep. Olympia Snowe

Antonia Novello

WHAM!

National Black Women's Health Project

Women and Aids: Moving the State Amber Hollibaugh, (NYC Human Rights Commission) Dr. Helen Rodriguez (Medical Director, AIDS institute) Cindy Patton (author of Sex and Germs: The Politics of AIDS)  ACT-UP

strategies for Fighting Violence Against Women WAC T T Sujata Warrier

Women Seize the Pulpit Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum

 

BARNARD

Barnard College ' Columbia University ° 3009 Broadway ' New York, NY 10027-6598

 

The Barnard Center for Research on VVomen

(212) 854-2067

The Scholar and the Feminist, 1993

Proposed title: Women as Change Makers: Building and Using Political Power.

This conference will focus on how women do and should seek power through movement politics and electoral politics. Conference organizers pre-suppose that there are many routes to power, and many different kinds of power: in workplaces, in homes, in healthcare, in religious institutions, in the arts, in education, and in bureaucracies, courts, legislatures, and executive offices.

  The heart of the conference will lie in analyzing women's

relationship to state power, as well as the strategic choice to develop institutions apart from the state that can generate power. We will examine how women gain power locally and nationally, and how they can best gain power in the future. Additionally, we will explore what women do with power once they get it, and ask what they should do with it.

The conference hopes to bring together appointed and elected government officials, and would-be officials; feminist activists and would-be activists; feminist scholars and would-be scholars, for constructive discussion and debate.

Suggested Format:

9:00--9:15 Welcome and Introductions: Ellen Futter and Leslie Calman

I. Morning Plenary 9:15--9:45 two 10-15 minute speeches by prominent, exciting speakers:

i.e. Ann Richards and Johnetta Coles?

Anita Hill and Barbara Boxer?

Lynn Yeakel and Carol Mosely Braun? 9:45--10:30 Discussion (with a moderator) between the two, and questions from the floor.

II. Workshops

10:45--12:15 Workshops: 2-3 facilitators, with 25 participants. Plan 20 workshops.

12:30-—1:3O Lunch

BARNARD  

Barnard College ° Columbia University - 3009 Broadway ° New York. NY 10027-6598

 

The Barnard Center for Research on \Vomen

(212) 854-2067

III. Panels

1:45--3:15 5 big panels: i.e. 2-3 speakers, and a‘ moderator, with 80-100 participants.

IV. 3:30-5:00 Closing speaker(s)? Anna Quindlen?  Susan Faludi? Marie Wilson? or a panel...? (i.e. see "Whither Feminism" below)

Rationale for the two different types of workshops/panels:

The smaller workshops have the virtue of allowing for real exchange and discussion, and a multiplicity of topics and facilitators/speakers.

The larger panels will allow us to attract some additional: "stars," who I presume will only come if they're told they're going to play to a big audience. In addition, if we're planning for 400-500 participants, that requires as many as 20 workshops to accommodate everyone (25x20=500). It would be very cumbersome to try to create gg workshops (20 in the morning, 20 in the afternoon).

The panels would have, in addition to the panelists, a moderator, whose job it would be to field questions and allow for maximum audience/panelist interaction.

Possible topics and speakers for panels and workshops: (many of: which could be further sub-divided!)

Whither Feminism: How To Create a Popular and Powerful Women's Agenda? Eleanor Smeal Patricia Ireland Angela Davis Marie Wilson Pat Schroeder Barbara Boxer What grass roots movements?

Getting and Using Power for Women in the Cities Ruth Messinger Sharon Pratt Kelly Carrie Saxon Perry Kathy Whitmire

BARNARD

Barnard College ° Columbia University - 3009 Broadway ° New York, NY 10027-6598

The Barnard Center for Research on \Vomen

(212) 854-2067

Carol Bellamy Prof. Ester Fuchs Prof. Joyce Gelb

Seeking and Gaining Political office: How It's Done

Presentations by

National Women's Political Caucus

Women's Campaign Fund

EMILY’s List

WISH

Reproductive Rights: Where Do We Go From Here?

Kate Michaelman

Faye Wattleton

National Black Women's Health Project

WHAM!

Republicans for Choice

Prof. Rosalind Petchesky

Prof. Suzanne Staggenborg (author of The Pro-Choice Movement, Oxford, 1991)

Theories of Women and the State Catharine MacKinon

Women as Judges: Do they Make a Difference? Eve Premminger Sandra Day O'Connor Rosalind Richter

Women in Congress: Do they Make a Difference? Prof. Ruth Mandel Sen. Barbara Mikulski Rep. Claudine Schneider

Strategies for Lesbian Legal and Political Empowerment Urvashi Vaid, NGLTF Paula Ettelbrick, Lambda Legal Defense and Education

Fund Rep. Barney Frank

Women, the Arts and the State: Fighting Censorship Prof. Natalie Kampen Catharine Stimpson

Native American Women and Political Power Wilma Mankiller (Cherokee Nation)

 

BARNARD

C Barnard College ° Columbia University - 3009 Broadway ° New York, NY 10027-6598

The Barnard Center for Research on Women

(212) 854-2067

What

Ada Deer (Menominee Tribe, Wisconsin) Ramona Bennett( Pulollop Tribe, Washington State)

Do Women Want, Anyway? Pollsters and Pundits Ethel Klein  

Celinda Lake

Linda DiVall

Barbara Farah

Prof. Michael Delli Carpini

The Power of the Media Woman: women Covering Politics

The Power of the Media:

Cokie Roberts Katha Pollitt Ellen Goodman Bonnie Angelo Murphy Brown (hey, if Dan Quayle can dream...)

How Media Cover Women in Politics

Women and Health: Moving the State

Rep. Pat Schroeder

Rep. Olympia Snowe

Antonia Novello

WHAM!

National Black Women's Health Project

Women and Aids: Moving the State

AIDS)

Amber Hollibaugh, (NYC Human Rights Commission) Dr. Helen Rodriguez (Medical Director, AIDS institute) Cindy Patton (author of Sex and Germs: The Politics of

ACT-UP

Strategies for Fighting Violence Against Women

WAC Sujata Warrier

Women Seize the Pulpit

Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum

 

BARNARD

Barnard College ° Columbia University ° 3009 Broadway ° New York, NY 10027-6598

 

The Barnard Center for Research on \Vomen

(212) 854-2067

The Scholar and the Feminist, 1993

Proposed title: Women as Change Makers: Building and Using Political Power.

This conference will focus on how women do and should seek power through movement politics and electoral politics. Conference organizers pre—suppose that there are many routes to power, and  many different kinds of power: in workplaces, in homes, in healthcare, in religious institutions, in the arts, in education, and in bureaucracies, courts, legislatures, and executive offices.

The heart of the conference will lie in analyzing women's relationship to state power, as well as the strategic choice to develop institutions apart from the state that can generate power. We will examine how women gain power locally and nationally, and how they can best gain power in the future. Additionally, we will explore what women do with power once they get it, and ask what they should do with it. y

The conference hopes to bring together appointed and elected government officials, and would—be officials; feminist activists and would—be activists; feminist scholars and would-be scholars, for constructive discussion and debate.

Suggested Format:

9:00--9:15 Welcome and Introductions: Ellen Futter and  Leslie Calman

I. Morning Plenary 9:15-—9:4b two 10-15 minute speeches by prominent, exciting speakers:  i.e. Ann Richards and Johnetta Coles? Anita Hill and Barbara Boxer? Lynn Yeakel and Carol Mosely Braun? 9:45--10:30 Discussion (with a moderator) between the two, and questions from the floor. II. Workshops 10:45—-12:15 Workshops: 2-3 facilitators, with 25

participants. Plan 20 workshops.

12:30--1:30 Lunch

BARNARD

Barnard College - Columbia University - 3009 Broadway ° New York. NY 10027-6598

§ ‘/ *3 h ', "7 °va3a§1’>°

 

The Barnard Center for Research on \Vomen

(212) 854-2067

III. Panels

1:45--3:15 5 big panels: i.e. 2-3 speakers, and a moderator, with 80-100 participants.

IV. 3:30-5:00 closing speaker(s)? Anna Quindlen? Susan Faludi? Marie Wilson? or a panel...? (i.e. see "Whither Feminism" below)

Rationale for the two different types of workshops/panels:

The smaller workshops have the virtue of allowing for real exchange and discussion, and a multiplicity of topics and facilitators/speakers.

The larger panels will allow us to attract some additional "stars," who I presume will only come if they're told they're going to play to a big audience. In addition, if we're planning for 400-500 participants, that requires as many as 20 workshops to accommodate everyone (25x20=500). It would be very cumbersome to try to create 30 workshops (20 in the morning, 20 in the afternoon).

The panels would have, in addition to the panelists, a moderator, whose job it would be to field questions and allow for maximum audience/panelist interaction.

Possible topics and speakers for panels and workshops: (many of which could be further sub-divided!)

Whither Feminism: How To Create a Popular and Powerful Women's Agenda? Eleanor Smeal Patricia Ireland Angela Davis Marie Wilson Pat Schroeder Barbara Boxer What grass roots movements?

Getting and Using Power for Women in the Cities Ruth Messinger Sharon Pratt Kelly Carrie Saxon Perry Kathy Whitmire

BARNARD

Barnard College ° Columbia University ° 3009 Broadway - New York, NY 10027-6598

The Barnard Center for Research on \Vomen

(212) 854-2067

Carol Bellamy Prof. Ester Fuchs Prof. Joyce Gelb

Seeking and Gaining Political office: How It's Done

Presentations by

National Women's Political Caucus

Women's Campaign Fund

EMILY’S List

WISH

Reproductive Rights: Where Do We Go From Here?

Kate Michaelman

Faye Wattleton

National Black Women's Health Project

WHAM!

Republicans for Choice

Prof. Rosalind Petchesky

Prof. Suzanne Staggenborg (author of The Pro-Choice Movement, Oxford, 1991)

Theories of Women and the State Catharine MacKinon

Women as Judges: Do they Make a Difference? Eve Premminger Sandra Day O'Connor Rosalind Richter

Women in Congress: Do they Make a Difference? Prof. Ruth Mandel Sen. Barbara Mikulski Rep. Claudine Schneider

Strategies for Lesbian Legal and Political Empowerment Urvashi Vaid, NGLTF Paula Ettelbrick, Lambda Legal Defense and Education

Fund Rep. Barney Frank

women, the Arts and the State: Fighting Censorship Prof. Natalie Kampen Catharine Stimpson

Native American Women and Political Power Wilma Mankiller (Cherokee Nation)

 

BARNARD

Barnard College ° Columbia L’nivcrsit~\' ' 3009 Broadway °‘New York. NY 10027-6598

 

The Barnard Center for Research on \Vomen

(212) 854-2067

Ada Deer (Menominee Tribe, Wisconsin) Ramona Bennett( Pulollop Tribe, Washington State)

What Do women Want, Anyway? Pollsters and Pundits

Ethel Klein

Celinda Lake

Linda DiVall

Barbara Farah

Prof. Michael Delli Carpini

The Power of the Media Woman: Women Covering Politics Cokie Roberts Katha Pollitt Ellen Goodman Bonnie Angelo Murphy Brown (hey, if Dan Quayle can dream...)

The Power of the Media: How Media Cover Women in Politics

Women and Health: Moving the State

Rep. Pat Schroeder

Rep. Olympia Snowe

Antonia Novello

WHAM ! ~

National Black Women's Health Project

Women and Aids: Moving the State Amber Hollibaugh, (NYC Human Rights Commission) Dr. Helen Rodriguez (Medical Director, AIDS institute) Cindy Patton (author of Sex and Germs: The Politics of AIDS) ACT-UP

Strategies for Fighting Violence Against Women WAC Sujata Warrier

Women Seize the Pulpit Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum