Why the Male Chauvinism Panel Consists of Men, 1972

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 It may be asked why the Women's Center at Barnard
 College is sponsoring a panel on male chauvinism at
 Columbia and why the panel consists of men.
 
 These are three answers:
 
 1) The charge that Columbia is a bastion of male
 chauvinism is a serious one. It is a charge which I
 personally have often and publically made.
 
 It is a serious charge because it implies that
 the attitudes which men have about themselves, each
 other and women are harmful, alien to humane values.
 
 Yet, as far as I know, a group of men at Columbia
 has never before publically discussed those charges.
 
 Nor have they, as far as I know, engaged in
 public questioning and debate in a completely open forum,
 except for an infrequent open hearing.
 
 
Public discussion, public questioning, public debate,
 even perhaps public self-analysis, can only be healthy.
 
 It may go on to illuminate deeper questions about}
 society at large. To put the Columbiaxcommunity into
 a broader context. 
 
 2) Women, as usual, are leading the struggle for
 their equality. This is as it should be. Yet, the
 problems the New Feminism raise are/problems which
 involve both men and women.
 
 Women cannot do all the work for men on these
 issues. Men should, I believe, help each other raise
 the level of masculine consciousness
 
 We organized a panel of men on male chauvinism in the hope
 of encouraging lots of men, through seeing distinguished examples, to realize 
 their responsibilities.
 
 
3) The Women's Center is also putting together a legal
 referral service for women. The lawyers will be mostly
 Barnard graduates. The service represents one of the
 first times the alumnae of a woman's college have
 organized in such a way on behalf of women.
 
 The panel tonight is benefit for the Lawyers Committee.
 A modest benefit, to be sure, but we hope that whatever
 contributions come in will help the Committee start its
 work.
 
 We have eight panelists. Obviously, the panel is
 large, but obviously, it cannot represent all the opinions,
 departments, and interests at Columbia. We have tried
 for some, but not total, range. The panelists are:
 
 
Our moderators are two of the most enlightened and
 promising women teaching today: Professor Elaine
 Showalter and Professor Ann Harris. 
 
 I want to thank the participants for their
 
 participation and the audience for coming.